A Solid Design Strategy Can Boost Client Satisfaction and Save You Time

Do-it-yourself clients, young marketing directors and new designers often don’t get the value of having a solid design strategy in place as they believe that flair and passion are more essential to the design process. As essential these elements are to the design process, they don’t always work and each client doesn’t respond the same way to designs created using flair and passion alone. To ensure the success of your company, you need to have a creative design strategy in place which is ultimately the only thing that will boost client satisfaction in the long run. Here are a few essentials you would need to keep in mind to keep your design strategy and well functioning all the time.

Include your clients in the design process

No matter how big a hot shot you are in the design world, when a client hires you to design something for them, you should always include them in the design process. Not only do you need to get the requirements of the client right, you also need to ensure that you get their vision of the final product just right. Even when a client says that they trust you completely, you should be open to hearing what they have to say and use their input in your design.

Include your clients in the design process

Compartmentalize key aspects

The simplest way to get web design right is to compartmentalize key aspects like tone, shape and color. Using an annotated wire-frame to get these critical aspects right could help simplify the process of designing for you while allowing your clients to gauge the progress in a much better way. Of course, if at any point your client wants to change any of these, you can get the people working on that aspect to modify it accordingly instead of starting the whole thing from scrap again.

Compartmentalize key aspects

See what inspires your client

Not all clients have a very clear view of what they would ultimately want their webpage design to look like. That is why they turn to professionals. However, an awesome design team knows how to get the client to spill the beans on their likes and dislikes and use that information to give the client exactly what they want. A great way to gauge client’s wishes is to use design surveys. Most such surveys have questions like what shapes they like, what colors work for them and which ones don’t and what kind of tone do they want their site to give off to visitors viewing the page.

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See what inspires your client

Use colors wisely

The use of color is an aspect that causes the most clashes between clients and designers. Most conservative clients are a little afraid of using splashy colors while others just don’t see how these represent their brand or company online. The best way to gauge what colors a client may be biased towards and what they want for their product would be to look at the colors on their existing logo and build the color scheme from there.

Use colors wisely

Offer sample styles

The distinction between color and style is a hard one to explain to clients who aren’t too familiar with the design process. A great way to get them to not confuse the two is to present style, i.e., shapes and patterns using a monochrome scheme while colors should be presented on their own. Alternatively, you can create a number of samples using the two and have the client pick the one they best like to further streamline the visual design process for you.

Offer sample styles

Mind the typeface

When picking a typeface for the text of a particular website, the best thing to do is to take a look at what typeface has been used in the company’s logo or brand mark. Using the same would be a little peculiar though using fonts that don’t deviate too far from them also works wonders. Use a font that is readable though sticking to time tested ones like Ariel and Times New Roman should be OK for clients with a conservative mindset.

Mind the typeface

Use mood boards

During the later stages of the design process, it becomes even more essential for web designers to know exactly what the client wants. Not taking this into account could have you present a finished product that you client absolutely hates at which point you would have to change everything and start all over again. To avoid this heartache, you simply need to create 2-3 mood boards with different typeface, style and color options. When your client picks one or shows a strong liking for it, it gives you a better idea of how to finish the projects.

Use mood boards

About The Author: Kate is a writer/blogger. She loves writing, traveling and reading books. She contributes to Hydroxycut